Category archive

History - page 3

Articles pertaining to political and economic history.

Posted on in Culture/History

Lester Cole: Hater

When I was a graduate student, my mentor of sorts, John Patrick Diggins, told me of an incident he had with blacklisted screenwriter Lester Cole, who along with nine others, testified before Congress 70 years ago, in 1947. Both were watching the Watergate hearings, when Cole exploded to Diggins, “See, it has to be done like Castro—democracy doesn’t work!” Whether true or not, this moment certainly fit Cole’s character. For, as the only member of the Hollywood Ten who remained a Stalinist, Cole hated till his dying day. Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Mailer and MacDonald: Rescuing The Warren Commission

For 50 years, critics of the Warren Commission have usually been associated with the Left. From Khrushchev to Oliver Stone (hardly a leap) have obviously sought a more politically satisfying sniper than the grubby deadbeat Oswald. With regard to the Warren Commission, it is merely a cover job designed to misdirect attention from the true conspirators onto Oswald. But not all leftists attacked the conclusions of the Warren Commission. Two writers, a former Trotskyite, the other a former Communist supporter, came (sometimes reluctantly) to the conclusion that Oswald indeed acted alone. Keep Reading

Posted on in History

Big Government Turf War: Stone vs Schlesinger

Dwight MacDonald, defending the Warren Commission, once made the valid point that if rightists did kill Kennedy, the liberal Lyndon Johnson would have been delighted to expose them for political gain. Such an argument was ignored by Oliver Stone in his ultra-paranoid JFK, in which he accused “fanatical Cold Warriors” of killing JFK because he was seeking to end the Cold War; and of particular importance to the Vietnam-obsessed Stone, ending the U.S. commitment to South Vietnam. Keep Reading

Posted on in History

Alvah Bessie: Fighting On Most Fronts

Psychiatrists who deal with returning military veterans note that those who have seen almost constant combat have trouble switching off, and search for an outlet to satisfy their martial needs. This was never more true for Spanish Civil War veteran and Communist Party member Alvah Bessie. Whenever his Party needed a rigid enforcer of the Party line toward revisionist members, and a fighter against the “fascists,” represented by HUAC, Bessie was front and center. Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Taft: Principles Over Emotional Satisfaction

John F. Kennedy’s 1957 book crediting a bi-partisan group of politicians who, as the title stated, exhibited “Profiles in Courage,” would later be revealed not to have been penned by the then-senator, but by his chief speechwriter (and later, Camelot spear-carrier Ted Sorenson). But that makes the inclusion of uber-conservative Republican Senator Robert Taft all the more remarkable. For Kennedy (actually more conservative than has been portrayed) was already strategizing how to garner support from the much-needed liberal groups in order to run for president. Taft was a hard swallow for liberals, who remembered the Senator’s initial support for Joseph… Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

American Cold War Culture: Liberal’s Favorite Boogeyman

Liberals today smirk at American Cold War culture of the late 40s to early 60s with their typical moral vanity. Unable to avoid the failures and horrors of communism, they nevertheless try to salvage 1960s’ era views of American culture as hysterically misinformed about a superpower that had missiles pointing at the U.S. But upon examination, it is apparent that the Left has done considerable editing by halting history around 1970, thus skipping whole decades of Venona revelations, the Berlin Wall falling and workers in Red Square toppling Lenin’s statue, resuming it. Hence archaic terms like military industrial complex can… Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

X-Rating The Holocaust: Dalton Trumbo’s Night Of The Aurochs

“I fear I am writing pornography.” So said former Communist and blacklisted screenwriter Dalton Trumbo about his on-again off-again attempt to address the Holocaust through the first-person narration of a concentration camp officer. When Auschwitz was liberated (ironically by the Red Army, which would soon institute a pogrom against Jews), a variety of writers tried to grapple with the Holocaust. Various interpretations of the Holocaust have been offered though out the years: Marxist (the Final Solution was the logical culmination of heartless capitalism and the fascism inherent in it); the banality of evil, the we-are-all-responsible school, etc.ect. ad nausaem. Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

John Wayne: Stalin’s Target

Asked once toward the end of his life about what he was proudest of, liberal activist and actor Paul Newman cited his appearance on Nixon’s “enemies list.” The flip side to this occurred with conservative actor John Wayne making it onto Stalin’s enemies list, with much more lethal consequences than anything Nixon had at his disposal. According to those close to Wayne, Stalin ordered Wayne liquidated after learning of the outspoken conservative actor’s popularity and anticommunist beliefs from a Russian film-maker who visited New York in 1949. Keep Reading

Posted on in History

David Ferrie: Fulfilling The Seedy Side of the JFK “Assassins”

Whenever the Grassy Knoll crowd needs a figure to represent the repellent seediness of JFK’s “actual” killers, they trot out David Ferrie. Dead for fifty years, the wigged, eyebrow glued macho homosexual has lived on in Kennedy conspiracy lore, memorably portrayed by a hyper-manic Joe Pesci in Oliver Stone’s laughable JFK, and is the pivotal figure that finally convinces Oswald to fire from the Texas School Book Depository at a president Oswald cannot muster up any feelings of hate toward in Don Delillo’s more sober Libra. Called in typically bombastic style by the headline grabbing, paranoid Jim Garrison, the District… Keep Reading

Posted on in History

Walter Krivitisky: Outing Stalin

Of all the events that triggered mass defections by communists from their party, the military partnership between Hitler and Stalin in 1939 may have been that caused the most. Hitler and Stalin’s joint invasion of democratic Poland registered shock waves among the communist faithful who joined the Party out of the perception that the Soviet Union was against Nazism. Arthur Koestler, Jr. spoke for many when he documented his disgust with the agreement: “I remained in that state of suspended animation until the day when the swastika was hoisted on Moscow airport in honor of Ribbentrop’s arrival and the Red… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Truman’s Spine

One of Ronald Reagan’s more obvious fallacies was his location of the date “the Democratic Party left me” as 1948. For this was during the reign of Harry Truman, a liberal anticommunist par excellence; indeed, Reagan’s strategy for causing a Soviet implosion in 1989 was partly traceable to Truman’s containment policy begun in 1947 (Reagan did contribute to this policy the crucial strategy of forcing the Soviets to compete in a costly arms race that assured the implosion courtesy of their flawed economic system). One could trace the Cold War, at least on the American side, to Truman’s meeting with… Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History/Politics

Morrie Ryskind: Communism Not Funny

Groucho Marx, a reluctant petitioner for the Hollywood Ten, once lamented that the 1947 HUAC hearings into Communist influence in Hollywood, had not been used as source material for a Marx Brothers’ film. The brothers’ unique brand of surrealist comedy would, he believed, found an ideal setting in the question-answer format and the perfect set of foils with the career politicians of HUAC. In a sense, one of the brothers did participate, and there was comedy, but not from him, nor of the intentional kind. Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

Edward Dmytryk: Paying His Dues

One of the charges lodged at Hollywood communists who voluntarily revealed their politics to Congress during the blacklist period was that said volunteers did it to avoid jail or get back on the studio payroll, or both. Director Edward Dymytrk has always been hard for them to spin. Originally one of the Hollywood Ten, the first set of communists in 1947 to testify, or in their case, not to testify by refusing to answer direct questions from Congress, Dmytryk, although having left the Communist Party two years before, nevertheless went to jail with the other 9 in order to prove… Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History/Politics

Isn’t “The Nation of Immigrants” A Bit Offensive?

We are now currently two months (or thereabouts) into the Trump administration. As you have probably noticed, the putsches and death squads and concentration camps and secret police that President Trump was supposed to enact have not really come around yet. And nor will they ever—for all of the “Literally Hitler” talk, bear in mind that Hitler’s goals were explicitly enumerated in Mein Kampf (in all of its 800+ page denseness), whereas Trump has never expressed any desire to be a fascist dictator (And you’d think he would have done so in the four New York Times Bestselling Books he’s written).… Keep Reading

Posted on in History

The Conflicted Nature of Robert Oppenheimer

In many ways, the father of the Atomic Bomb, J. Robert Oppenheimer, has long been portrayed by liberals as a figure horrified about what he unleashed on the world, particularly with regard to Hiroshima and Nagasaki. However, in one film, Fat Man and Little Boy, he was portrayed as conscience-striken from the get-go. But the reality was different. Initially Oppenheimer approached the project as a purely technical problem. It was only after the experiment worked that he allowed the moral dimension in. His background in literature—the choice of “Trinity” was his, after a John Donne poem that he liked—made Oppenheimer recall… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Philosophy

H.L Mecken: Pro-German Rather Than Libertarian

H.L Mencken’s reputation as an independent-minded journalist rests on his lampooning of American politicians, his championship of, but not political sympathies with dissidents prosecuted and deported by the American government during World War I, and his public role as a defender of Scopes during the Evolution vs Bible Monkey Trial in 1925. Conservatives today claim him for his libertarian opposition to the New Deal, his fierce commitment to civil liberties, and his denouncement of collectivism in all forms. Liberals adopt him for his attacks on Christian fundamentalism, his faith in science, and his opposition to World War I. But what… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Islamic Ties To Hitler

In his last great battle in a lifetime of dust-ups, the late Christopher Hitchens in the aftermath of Sept. 11th, coined the term “Islamofascists” to describe and denounce the Muslim world. Linking it to 20th-century fascist movements, Hitchens elaborated: “The most obvious points of comparison would be these: Both movements are based on a cult of murderous violence that exalts death and destruction and despises the life of the mind. (“Death to the intellect! Long live death!” as Gen. Francisco Franco’s sidekick Gonzalo Queipo de Llano so pithily phrased it.) Both are hostile to modernity (except when it comes to… Keep Reading

Posted on in History

I.F. Stone: More Dupe Than Journalist

In our era of mainstream media journalists, masquerading under the easily penetrable guise of objective reporting, it is refreshing to find a journalist upfront about their politics. Such a figure was I.F. Stone who made no bones about his Soviet sympathies. Despite this, or more likely, because of it, mainstream media journalists laud Stone as the investigative journalist par excellence. Stone became a radical early, joining the Socialist Party before the age of 18, and after that, doing public relations for Socialist Party presidential candidate Norman Thomas. Even earlier, Stone became a journalist, joining a liberal monthly at the age… Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

Robert Taylor: Accurately Naming Names

Toward the end of his life, liberal actor Orson Welles reported being told by Nikita Khrushchev on a Hollywood visit by the Soviet premiere that Stalin had once targeted conservative actor John Wayne for liquidation. Although not reaching this height and honor on Stalin’s “enemies’ list,” conservative matinee idol Robert Taylor was able to have the distinction of having his films banned in Communist Hungary and in Czechoslovakia. And, depending upon your point of view, Taylor had the distinction of organizing Hollywood anticommunists into a political group (The Motion Picture Alliance for the Preservation of American Ideals), and being the… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Was George Orwell A Neocon?

Every decade or so pundits return to the question of whether George Orwell was a conservative. The answer is dependent on the questioner’s ideology. Norman Podhoretz claimed him as a neoconservative. Christopher Hitchens, still in thrall to socialism, stated that Orwell “was conservative about many things, but not politics.” By and large, this bodysnatching relied on the same facts, and thus spin was required. However, the recent publication of Orwell’s letters and diaries bolsters the conservative interpretation while also showing how hard it was for the writer to let go of socialism. For example, Orwell, still promoting socialism, albeit a… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Another Wall

Fifty-six years ago, the Berlin Wall was erected and gave the West the ultimate propaganda victory in the Cold War. JFK certainly viewed it as such. While he enraged some of his military advisers by refusing to green-light an invasion (supply lines would have been impossible to maintain), he nevertheless pronounced the images of people fleeing with literally their clothes on their backs. (By August 1961, an average of 2,000 East Germans were escaping into the West every day.) While guerilla-faced East German guards batted and drug the slower back to the East as “a failure of communism.” He told… Keep Reading

Posted on in History

Ernest Roehm: Nazi Dissident

In an example of him desperately trying to retain even a molecule of his collegiate Marxism, the late Christopher Hitchens refused to accept that Soviet communism was equivalent to Nazi Germany. One of his broadsides against this comparison was that, unlike the Soviet Union, whose government figures accused Stalin of betraying the Russian Revolution, Nazi Germany had “no dissidents…risking their lives on the proposition the Fuhrer had betrayed the true essence of National Socialism.” But in his rush to make this point, Hitchens had not done his homework, for there were dissidents in the Nazi Party who accused Hitler of… Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

The Optimism of George Orwell

Upon receiving the manuscript of what would be George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, publisher Frederic Warburg considered the novel the most “depressing” and “pessimistic” thing he ever read. Many Orwell scholars, sharing this view, attributed the novel’s bleakness to Orwell dying by inches during the composition of the novel. But despite the novel’s depiction of a broken Winston Smith, Orwell’s hopes never wavered, which must have been considerable when viewing the world of 1948-49. The Soviets had Eastern Europe and an atomic bomb. China would soon go Communist. Time was running out, but Orwell didn’t rule out that the English could… Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

Raymond Chandler: Hardly A Proletarian Writer

When Hollywood Communists Adrian Scott, a producer, and Edward Dmytryk sought material that was both entertaining and capable of making their anti-capitalist points, they searched no further than noir writer Raymond Chandler. Chandler’s hyper-cynical portrayal of a murdering, drug-taking upper class, corrupt brutal cops and all of the above’s business relationship with LA’s criminal element must have seemed perfect for communist agitprop. The result of Scott and Dymtryk’s labors was Murder My Sweet (1944), an adaptation of Chandler’s second novel, Farewell My Lovely. In it, an unshaven and punch-drunk Dick Powell weaves through a maze of quacks capitalizing on neurotic… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Close Call: 1948 Presidential Election

Historians locate a decisive moment in the Republican Presidential campaign of 1940: The nomination the internationalist Wendell Wilkie, and in essence forever said goodbye to its isolationist wing. For the Democrats, their decisive moment was 1948. That year, Democrats engaged in an inner-party debate, a battle for its soul, between the accommodationist policies of FDR toward the Soviet Union and the containment faction. Truman was truly besieged on every possible side of the political spectrum. Across the aisle, Republicans were seeking to capitalize on the President’s low poll numbers and the public’s exhaustion with 16 years of Democratic rule. Within… Keep Reading

Posted on in History

Himmler: Soldier Wannabe

When war was declared in 1914, a failed painter and bum named Adolf Hitler fell to his knees with joyful tears running down his cheeks and promptly signed up. While others were miserable in the trenches, Hitler enjoyed his role as trench runner. Equally ecstatic about World War I, Heinrich Himmler never got his chance to bear arms, and this disappointment explains, perhaps even more than any anti-Semitism, his feverish service for Hitler as head of the secret police: Himmler was overcompensating. Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Jay Lovestone: Americanizing Marxism

During the early years of the Great Depression, where a considerable number of American intellectuals threw in with the communist candidate for president in 1932, William Z. Foster, literary critic Edmund Wilson urged American Communists to take Marxism away from the Russians and “Americanize it.” But this advice went unheeded and from 1932 onward, American Communists took their cues from Russia, a country with no democratic traditions. What may have been a lost opportunity, depending upon your point of view as to whether communism could be applied at all to American democracy, was briefly provided by Jay Lovestone, who helped… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

FDR’s Death And The Cold War

During the Cold War, the Right attacked FDR for his appeasement of Stalin, which assured the Soviet empire. In the words of moderate Republican Senator Ralph Flanders, the Soviet aggression America was faced with during the early Cold War period came about because Roosevelt “was soft as taffy on the subject of communism.” The flip side to this came from the communist Left, who asserted that FDR was a progressive for peace and a better world along with Stalin, and with his death, the opportunity for peaceful co-existence was lost because of the “fascist” president Harry S. Truman. Faced with… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Philosophy/Politics

We Can’t Be Friends

We will never forget 2016. A new Star Wars came out. Several celebrities passed on. Clemson upset #1 Alabama in the national championship game (still happy about that happening). The Cubs, for the first time since 1908, won the World Series. A great year all around. However, 2016 was most remembered for Donald John Trump’s victory for President. You see, the night of November 8, 2016, the third famous American political dynasty died — The Clinton Dynasty. Even I was stunned. However, while the world was seemingly being turned upside down, one thing remained: the hypocrisy and selfishness of the… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Children of Stalin

Today, under former KGB spook Vladimir Putin, the older generation pines for Josef Stalin (and may have found him in the form of Vladimir). The proclaimed reason for wishing Uncle Joe was back is that Koba gave the populace a supposed sense of security. But what kind of security? For the older generation, it probably means a time when Russians were not besieged by the burdens and consequences of personal freedom and the free market; where today the older generation scowl at entrepreneurs and the Russian mafia and a youth more interested in their iPods than social justice. Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Charlton Heston: The Democratic Party Left Him

When that rare celebrity moves from liberalism to conservatism, pundits like to cite Ronald Reagan’s move from New Deal Democrat to Goldwater as pioneering such movement. Reagan claimed in his famous phrase that “I didn’t leave the Democratic Party; it left me.” But the year he cited for this parting of ways, 1948, doesn’t hold up. In 1948, the Democratic Party had shifted from Grand Alliance partnership to Communist containment. Reagan’s chronology of a Democratic Party becoming too leftist only works if their presidential candidate that year had been Henry Wallace, not Harry Truman. Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Masochism: The Left After Camelot

On November 22, 1963, Left and Right came together briefly in an awful contemplation. A hostile mob surrounded the headquarters of Barry Goldwater, the prospective Republican nominee against John F. Kennedy in 1963, chanting “Murderers!” On the other side, the Eastern Republican establishment also got into the act. Immediately after Kennedy’s assassination, Richard Nixon phoned FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover and asked, “Was it one of the right-wing nuts?” Even in the Goldwater camp, there was suspicion that Kennedy had fallen victim to a right-wing assassin. Denison Kitchel, the manager of Goldwater’s senatorial campaign, muttered, “My God, one of the… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Joseph Davis: “This Book Will Last”

When George Orwell first heard about Josef Stalin’s Purge Trials, he immediately believed them to be rigged. It wasn’t so much the inconsistencies and fantasies of the prosecution (one of the charges lodged at these supposed Russian conspirators with Hitler to overthrow the Stalin regime had the traitors meeting with Nazis at a hotel that didn’t exist anymore) but the heavy-handed propaganda voiced by the regime. Even though the accused “admitted” their complicity with the Trotsky/Hitler cabal–it was later discovered that they were drugged and tortured into confessing–Orwell astutely saw them as a monstrous frame-up because he “felt” it in… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Was George Orwell a McCarthyite?

In 1996, it was revealed that George Orwell gave a list he compiled of suspected Communists to a representative of MI-5. Since then, Orwell has been decried as a snitch and McCarthyite by the Left. This name-calling if nothing else, does open a fruitful historical inquiry about Orwell and the Cold War–namely, was George Orwell a McCarthyite? Premature might be a better description since Orwell died before McCarthy emerged as a national phenomenon in the early 1950s. But the comparison is still potentially fruitful. For Orwell survived into the postwar years, the dawning of the Cold War, functioning as a… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Tech

Sputnik at 60: More Than Just a Rocket

Already jittery from nuclear drills and the threat of “reds under the bed,” America in 1957 could still find solace in the comforting illusion that the Soviets, while dangerous, were hopelessly backward. “If the Russians built a dam,” an Army officer stationed in Berlin was quoted as saying, “the water would flow backwards.” True, the Soviets had the bomb. But the perception, from the halls of government to John Q. Citizen, was that they had acquired atomic capability not through honest research but through the efforts of American traitors like the Rosenbergs. The launch of Sputnik, the world’s first space… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Philosophy

Mencken’s Last Hurrah

By 1948, H.L. Mencken was sixty-eight years old and had covered twelve presidential elections. The commonly accepted view of him was that his glory days as an attack dog on the cant that politicians spewed out were over. From being the most read newspaperman of his day, the 1920s, he was, by the 1930s, largely forgotten because of his anti-New Deal views. His opposition to the “Good War,” further alienated him from audiences and compelled him to spend the war years writing nostalgic memoirs. But there would be one more great moment before the end. Mere months before a stroke… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Democracy is Dangerous

Winston Churchill once said: “Indeed it has been said that democracy is the worst form of government except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time…” In line with this quote, for many in the United States democracy is held as the highest political ideal, Abraham Lincoln described a government “of the people, by the people, and for the people.” Public history classes are replete with examples of the triumph of the progressives over the reactionary forces of the founding era. Checks and balances and other constitutional restrictions, carefully crafted, were (and are) seen as… Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

Hemingway and Orwell

Ernest Hemingway and George Orwell were clearly polar opposites. Hemingway had much more plush circumstances owing to a rich wife; Orwell by turns was subsisting with his wife on an almost all-potato diet. But ideologically Hemingway claimed Orwell on the basis of the latter’s attack on Stalinist duplicity in Spain. But the history of both men’s experiences in 1930s Spain said otherwise. Their one and only meeting accentuated both men’s experiences in the Spanish Civil War. In recently liberated France in 1945, Ernest Hemingway reported soothing George Orwell as he would a mental patient. Instead of a drink, he calmed the… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Budd Schulberg: Frustrating the Right and the Left

Historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr., in many ways the epitome of liberal anticommunism, or as he liked to call it, “the Vital Center,” always greeted attacks by both the Right and the Left as proof he was correct. The same satisfaction could have been granted to Budd Schulberg, novelist, Academy-Award winning screenwriter, and for a time, a member of the Hollywood Communist Party. Schulberg had the distinction of being a target of both right-wing studio heads and hard-line communists. Worse for the latter, who spent their energies bemoaning the blacklist, Schulberg shamed them by devoting his energies to helping the downtrodden… Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

John Howard Lawson: Making Up For Lost Time

To anti-communists, he was the leader and epitome of the well-fed Hollywood communists. Among his comrades behind closed doors, he was regarded as a “sectarian son of a bitch,” who was, outside of Stalin, the cause of defections. For the California Democratic Party during World War II, and much to their later embarrassment, he was deemed worthy enough to write their 1942 state platform. John Howard Lawson, screenwriter, activist and head of the Hollywood branch of the American Communist Party, he was all of the above. A celebrated playwright, on the basis of one play, Lawson came to the Communist… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

1917: The Dream Is Still Alive

One hundred years ago, the Bolshevik Revolution occurred, and with it came the delusions of three decades’ worth of intellectuals and sentiments that still exist today. The stature of those who defended the accompanying Soviet internal policies that led to the deaths of 20 million–far more than Hitler’s actions–was and is astounding. America’s premier journalist Lincoln Stevens (“I have seen the future and it works”), playwright George Bernard Shaw (“Stalin is kind to dogs and children”), Lillian Hellman (“Stalin has the love of intellectuals”), Dashiell Hammett (who along with Hellman signed a petition supporting the Purge Trials), FDR confidant Joseph… Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

Max Eastman: Curmodgeon

During the height of the violent protests by the anti-war movement in the late 60s, a cartoon circulated that reflected the shock parents experienced at their long-haired, profanity-spewing communist-flag waving children. In an attempt to soothe said parents the cartoon had one wife telling her husband, “Don’t worry about it, honey. Why, even Max Eastman ended up writing for Readers’ Digest.” This implication that Eastman, once nearly thrown in jail for supposedly violating the Espionage Act by opposing World War I on socialist grounds, had now embraced the establishment depends heavily on which establishment one is talking about. Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

Martha Gellhorn: Pioneering the Mainstream Media

When mentioned by female journalists today, Martha Gellhorn is cited as a pioneer by breaking the bounds of females reporting in combat conditions. But Gellhorn is also a pioneer in another area; that of the mainstream media. As with today’s leftist-dominated news media, Gellhorn threw objectivity to the wind (although, to her credit, she was much more forthright about this than the CNN crowd today who feign objectivity), and was clearly soft on the political left. Gellhorn came from a liberal background; her mother was a decided feminist. Her marriages were all to left-wing men. But it took the Great… Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

Dwight MacDonald: His Own Man

In his lifetime, journalist Dwight MacDonald was regarded by his fellow New York intellectual crowd as an ambulance-chasing ideologue. From Macy’s employee to Trotskyite to liberal anti-communist to anarchist to born-again New Leftist, MacDonald gave the appearance of being intellectually promiscuous. The reality, though, is that MacDonald was the best kind of journalist: intellectually rigorous, unwilling to embrace dogmatism in any form, unworried about whether he was providing ammunition to the “enemy,” be they left or right. A graduate of Yale (which, by itself, separated himself from his group, The New York Intellectuals, who were composed primarily of Jews who… Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

Bogart: Communist Dupe

In 1947, actor Humphrey Bogart, who had just signed with Warner Brothers the most lucrative contract in the history of motion pictures, awoke to see his picture on the front page of the Daily Worker praising him as a fighter for the Communist Party. An FDR liberal, Bogart had as little sympathy for communism, he once stated, as J.Edgar Hoover. What prompted his photo on the flagship paper of the American Communist Party was Bogart, along with his new wife, Lauren Bacall, organizing the Committee for the First Amendment, a group of liberals formed to defend ten industry figures subpoenaed… Keep Reading

Posted on in History/Politics

Lionel Trilling: Cold War Prophet

Depending who wants to claim as one of their own, literary critic Lionel Trilling has been called a conservative, a neoconservative (a direction we are assured by neocons of where he was headed before his death in 1975), and a liberal anti-communist. One thing missed in this game of ideological scrabble is how much of a Cold War prophet Trilling was in point of fact. This is evidenced by his one and only novel, The Middle of the Journey, now seventy years old. When it debuted in 1947, the novel came and went, garnering praise only in England. And so… Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

Exploiting His Race: Paul Robeson

When African-American writer and communist Richard Wright was physically expelled by his comrades during a May Day parade in 1937, he concluded that he “would always be for them, but they would not be for him.” He quietly left the Party but would not go public with his departure until 1944. What earned Wright the violence from the marchers was his determination to write as an African-American first and as a Party member second. Such a view was verboten in the Party despite their loud clamor about civil rights for blacks. Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

Whittaker Chambers: Crusading Journalist

Because of his role in outing Soviet spy Alger Hiss, Whittaker Chambers’ other career, not that of paid witness he would become, has been overshadowed. For Chambers was a journalist par excellence. He had the distinction of having written for the New Masses, Time, and National Review. At the time of his testimony, he was a highly-paid writer at Time. The pro-Hiss left no doubt wishes he’d stayed at the typewriter rather than appearing behind a congressional microphone. Without Chambers, the Hiss case would never have gotten off the ground and Chambers would have toiled away his remaining days writing… Keep Reading

fascism
Posted on in History/Politics

The Fascism of the Lawless Left

The birthplace of the free speech movement, UC Berkeley, was desecrated recently by a platoon of masked cowards who set fires, smashed windows, and assaulted peaceful people who had gathered there to hear a talk by infamous internet maven, Milo Yiannopoulos. Their efforts were successful: Milo canceled his appearance and the perpetrators of the inexcusable violence faded into the night. Not a single arrest was made in a stunning instance of law enforcement joining the lawless to make a mockery of the rule of law. These terrorists are not some modern version of good Samaritans, they are mercenaries, they are… Keep Reading

Posted on in Culture/History

How Reagan Handled Out of Control Berkeley Hippies

On Wednesday, Alt-Right provocateur Milo Yiannopolous held an event at the University of California at Berkeley. It was taken over by violent protesters who used pepper spray and metal poles to assault Trump supporters and those who came to hear Milo. Demonstrations and violence against those engaging in free speech are becoming more and more common at campuses across the U.S. as leftists continue to shut down speakers that they don’t agree with. Regardless of whether or not we agree with Milo or any of the things that he was speaking about on campus, shutting him down is not appropriate.… Keep Reading

Go to Top

Thanks for visiting our site! Stay in touch with us by subscribing to our newsletter. You will receive all of our latest updates, articles, endorsements, interviews, and videos direct to your inbox.